how to raise your credit score fast

how to raise your credit score fast

How to raise your credit score fast

How to raise your credit score fast, Your credit score—a three-digit number lenders use to help them decide how likely it is they’ll be repaid on time if they grant you a credit card or loan—is an important factor in your financial life. The higher your scores, the more likely you are to qualify for loans and credit cards at the most favorable terms, which will save you money.

How to raise your credit score. If your credit history is not where you want it to be, you’re not alone. Improving your credit scores takes time, but the sooner you address the issues that might be dragging them down, the faster your credit scores will go up.

You can increase your scores by taking several steps, like establishing a track record of paying bills on time, paying down debt and taking advantage of tools like Experian Boost , a new product that allows you to add utility and cell phone bills to your credit file.

There are a lot of tips and tricks on how to improve your credit score – and we’ll get to those in a moment – but nothing you see, hear or read about the subject will impact your credit score faster or more effectively than paying bills on time and using your credit cards judiciously.

How to raise your credit score, “If you are trying to give people advice for improving their score, pointing them toward those two components – things that are relatively easy to change – is a very good start,” said Tatiana Homonoff, an assistant professor of Economics and Public Policy at New York University, who did a two-year study on credit scores and published a paper on it in April of 2018.

Homonoff, who is affiliated with the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at NYU, added: “There are some parts of the credit score algorithm that are very hard to effect, but paying bills on time and being aware of credit utilization are things people can do with some ease, even if they’re in a tough financial position.”

Consumers are becoming more aware of how improving their credit score improves their financial outlook and Homonoff’s study has evidence of it. She found consumer behavior improved dramatically when people were aware of their credit score.

“Many people thought they had a great score, but then found out they overestimated it,” she said. “They realized they had to start changing credit behaviors, so they stopped making late payments, they paid off cards with a

balance and their scores improved.”

It is worth knowing that it takes more time to repair a bad credit score than it does to build a good one. Mistakes penalize your credit score and end up costing hundreds or thousands of dollars in higher interest rates when borrowing. A poor credit score also can be a roadblock to renting an apartment, setting up utilities, and maybe even getting a job!

                               credit report

12 Tips for Improving Your Credit Score

If you are like many consumers and don’t know your credit score, there are several free places you can find it. The Discover Card is one of several credit card sources that offer free credit scores. Discover provides your FICO score, the one used by 90% of businesses that do lending. Most other credit cards like Capital One and Chase give you a Vantage Score, which is similar, but not identical. Same goes for online sites like Credit Karma, Credit Sesame and Quizzle.

The Vantage Score comes from the same place that FICO gets its information – the three major credit reporting bureaus, Experian, TransUnion and Equifax – but it weighs elements differently and there could be a slight difference in the two scores.

Once you get your score, as Homonoff suggested, you might be surprised if it’s not as high as you expected. These are ways to improve the score.

Here are 12 things you can do now to improve your credit score:

  1. Review Your Credit Report – You are entitled to one free credit report a year from each of the three reporting agencies and requesting one has no impact on your credit score. Review the report closely. Dispute any errors that you find. This is the closest you can get to a quick credit fix. Notifying the credit reporting agency of wrong or outdated information will improve your score as soon as the false information is removed.
  2. Set Up Payment Reminders – Write down payment deadlines for each bill in a planner or calendar and set up reminders online. Consistently paying your bills on time can raise your score within a few months.
  3. Pay More Than Once in a Billing Cycle – If you can afford it, pay down your bills every two weeks rather than once a month. This lowers your credit utilization and definitely improves your score.
  4. Contact Your Creditors – Do this immediately to set up a payment plan if you miss payment deadlines and can’t afford your monthly bills. Quickly addressing your problem can ease the negative effects of late payments and high outstanding balances.
  5. Apply for New Credit Sparingly – Although it increases your total credit limit, it hurts your score if you apply for or open several new accounts in a short time period.
  6. Don’t Close Unused Credit Card Accounts – The age of your credit history matters, and a longer history is better. If you must close credit accounts, close newer ones.
  7. Be Careful Paying Off Old Debts – If a debt is “charged off” by the creditor, it means they do not expect further payments. If you make a payment on a charged off account, it reactivates the debt and lowers your credit score. This often happens when collection agencies are involved.
  8. Pay Down “Maxed Out” Cards First – If you use multiple credit cards and the amount owed on one or more is close to the credit limit, pay that one off first to bring down your credit utilization rate.
  9. Diversify Your Accounts – Your credit mix — mortgage, auto loans, student loans and credit cards — counts for 10% of your credit score. Adding another element to the current mix helps your score, as long as you make on-time payments.
  10. Quick Loan Shopping – If you have bad credit and can’t find any other way to improve your score, you could consider taking a “quick loan.” These are typically loans for small amounts — $250 to $1,000 — that get repayment history reported to credit agencies, and can become a positive on your credit report. This is a last resort.
  11. See If You Qualify for a 0% Interest Card – Several companies offer cards with 0% interest on balances, but there are caveats to this. There can be a fee for transferring the balance and the zero-percent offer is only good for an introductory period, typically 12-18 months. It usually takes a very good credit score to qualify for one of these.
  12. Consider a Debt Consolidation Plan – There could be a temporary drop in your credit score if you enroll in a debt consolidation program, but as long as you make on-time payments, your score quickly improves and you are eliminating the debt that got you in trouble to start with.

How Long Does It Take to Rebuild Credit?

How to raise your credit score. Typically, it takes at least 3-6 months of good credit behavior to see a noticeable change in your credit score. It is difficult to make a change any faster, unless the negative information on your credit report was a minor blip, like being late with bill payments one month.

While it is impossible to put a specific time frame on credit repair, it is safe to say the less negative information you have on your report – late payments, maxed out credit cards, constant credit applications, bankruptcy, etc. – the easier it is to repair your credit score.

You are not going to lose nearly as many points if you are late with one payment as you will if you are delinquent for several months to the point where your account has been turned over to a collection agency. The severity of the second situation is far greater than the first and your score will reflect that.

Here are some time frames for negative information that detracts from your credit score.

  • A delinquent account remains on your credit report for seven years.
  • Car repossession stays on your report for seven years.
  • Chapter 7 bankruptcy is on your report for 10 years. Chapter 13 remains for seven years.
  • Credit application inquiries remain on your report for two years.
  • Public record items such as property liens are on your report seven years.

It is very important to remember that the damage to your credit score diminishes over time. So, for example, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy in Year Six has negligible impact when compared to its effect in Year One.

Dear debt adviser,

I make pretty good, money but my credit score is low. What’s the fastest way to raise my score? I have looked for advice from credit repair places, but I haven’t determined whether they are right for me. I have paid off two credit cards and one jewelry account in the past 14days. Can you help?

Fredrick

Dear Fredrick,

Yes I can help. It good that you’re thinking carefully about using credit repair service, in many cases you’re paying a company to do things that you think you can’t do yourself. And many of these companies are disreputable, they will take your money, further harm your credit and then there will be no where to find them. You can repair credit yourself with some patience and some guidance

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